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Do apples clean teeth? A new study has a surprising answer.

An Apple a Day Keeps Plaque Away | Myth or Miracle

You’ve heard the old proverb “an apple a day keeps the doctor away.” But, what about the dentist? Do apples clean teeth?

Apples have great nutritional benefits, especially when eaten whole.  They’re certainly better for you than candy or other sugary snacks. But can they keep back a plaque attack?

The thought is that chewing the fibrous fruit helps ‘brush’ away food debris – and even plaque – from your teeth.  It’s been tested in various ways for years, often with conflicting results.  A recent experiment out of Spain is the latest.

According to the published report, chewing an apple appeared to increase the amount of plaque on the teeth of test subjects! But don’t sour on apples just yet. The researchers thought it possible the fruit simply reacted with the dye agent used to assess plaque.

The results weren’t all bad for the orchard. The experiment found the saliva generated from eating an apple helped clean the mouth of bacteria. This happens because your saliva counteracts acids left behind in your mouth. It also breaks down foods, cleaning harmful debris from your teeth.

There are still lots of benefits to eating fruits and vegetables that can help keep many health care providers at bay. You can even use apples for a lesson in cavities.  But if you were hoping that eating an apple would be a sweet substitute, there’s still nothing better than the toothbrush and fluoride toothpaste.

So, have an apple a day for your health, and brush twice a day for a bright healthy smile!